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The poster for this conference epitomises the creativity and richly imaginative content that defined the event itself.

I have attended many ‘Medical Humanities’, ‘Health and Humanities’, ‘Medical Narrative’ and such like conferences in the past. Medicine Unboxed 2013 – with this year’s theme of Voice – stands alone as something uniquely innovative and stimulating, as well as both emotionally and intellectually challenging.

The twitter (#MU13VOICE) and facebook feeds are excellent and will give you a real sense of the diversity and substance of the content. Although I could only attend the first day, I was so very pleased to have been physically present for even 50% of the entire programme.

‘Voice’ (full programme – http://www.medicineunboxed.com/2013-voice/) was presented and discussed as the poetic voice (Jo Shapcott and Andrew Motion), the patient (Rhys Morgan), the captured voice (Fi Glover, The Listening Project), the singing voice (Birmingham Medical School Choir, Melanie and Rebecca Askew), the performed voice (Bobby Baker), and the sung voice (in terms of composition and phonetics, and music as therapy, and as an end in itself).

It is difficult to pinpoint exact reasons why I found the conference so refreshing and stimulating. The absence of medical-type presentations contributed, and Sam Guglani et al.’s creative approach to all possible aspects of ‘Voice’ in terms of health and medicine was hugely impressive.

I wonder whether the audience consisted of many non-medical/non-health-care professionals. One thing that irked me was the repeated use of the word ‘patient’. It grated. Perhaps this is because I no longer work in clinical medicine. As an ‘outsider’, ‘patient’ feels like a label that attaches an otherness to those who are ill, whereas in fact, as identified by Susan Sontag, the gap between ‘them’ and ‘us’ is very narrow…

My experience of sitting outside clinical medicine left me much to consider also following the session on the ‘Medical Voice’, in which Iona Heath, Deborah Bowman, Julian Baggini and Charlotte Blease participated. A ‘crisis in empathy’ amongst doctors was highlighted here, and there was much discussion on how medical training could be improved to address this.

I have often been critical of the lack of empathy and compassion that those who are ill have experienced during the medical consultation. I left clinical medicine a few years ago, to explore medical humanities/health and humanities (not quite sure what to call it anymore), and now work as an editor for an organisation that creates books on health and illness for children. We recently advertised for a junior doctor for the role of a medical writer. I was overwhelmed by the quantity (and quality) of the applicants – over 20 junior doctors, all disillusioned by their first years in clinical medicine. Most had no intention of ever returning to the field.

I found this sad, that the system (‘medicine’, the NHS…) had somehow failed them to the extent that just a few years working as clinical doctors made them want to walk away. We are quick to criticise doctors and how they behave, which is sometimes, but not always, justifiable. Yesterday, I found myself in the unusual position of wanting to make a plea for the ‘Medical Voice’, that it might be heard and witnessed too…

My view has inevitably been tempered by my distancing. For a perspective from a doctor within clinical medicine, do check out Jonathon Tomlinson’s response to Medicine Unboxed 2013, which truly reflects a ‘Medical Voice’ that needs to be heard: http://abetternhs.wordpress.com/2013/11/23/burden/

CQ

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