…which is a quote from Anna Quindlen, the Pulitzer Prize winning journalist, novelist and essayist.

But her question does not in any way relate to her hugely impressive CV and achievements. Rather, it stems from her encounters with healthcare professionals, which has prompted her reflections on the extent to which she was seen as an individual in that context, as a person rather than as ‘just another patient’.

The writer was recently invited to deliver the Humanism in Medicine lecture at the Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC) annual meeting (http://humanizingmedicine.org/anna-quindlen-advises-physicians/).

Quindlen’s question – “Do you know who I am?” – arose from her experience of two separate medical encounters, both involving anaesthesiologists. The first was patronising (my judgement call), and left her doubtful as to whether he knew anything about her or about her previous history.

The second encounter was a positive one:

“Only a short interchange, yet in some fashion she knew who I was.”

Quindlen continues:

“And I assume she was at least as busy as her male colleagues.”

But gender distinctions are not the point. Instead, what Quindlen wants to get across is that she felt ‘seen’ by one professional, and not by the other.

“She was professional, and she was kind. Oh, what a combination that is in what often seems like a cold and inhuman world.”

Quindlen sees the problems in health care – patients feeling ignored, isolated, patronised – as part of a larger societal problem. Power relationships wherever they occur, and which too often underlie the doctor-patient encounter, ‘foment fear and mistrust and alienation’. She speaks of the ‘MDeity’, doctors as little gods, and is surprised how pervasive this remains, despite huge technological and other advances.

Quindlen’s conclusion is that in the end, the person – the patient, the sufferer – seeks and needs ‘the human touch’, to be seen as an individual, and to be considered as such.

She ends with advice for the doctors she addresses:

  • Try to be present in the moment
  • Acknowledge uncertainty
  • Practice empathy
  • Try to be kind

CQ

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